Goal Setting

Spend time defining your motivation.

Lately it’s become trendy to reject the idea of New Year resolutions, in favour of the perspective that goal-setting should not be isolated to one point in the year. Whether or not you agree with this opinion, there’s no harm in taking the beginning of a new calendar year as an opportunity to refine intentions and priorities!

We also have a sneaking suspicion that perhaps the reason why people have turned their backs on New Year resolutions is that their goal-setting techniques are not as effective as they could be, and so they wind up feeling as if it’s all a waste of time. So, we’ve compiled some goal-setting strategies for you. You can take January as an opportunity to set some new goals, or you can wait until it feels more natural for you – either way, we hope these tips will help you to find success in achieving your goals this year.

1) Set yourself up for success, not failure.

We all know that the number one rule of goal-setting is to be realistic. Don’t give yourself an insurmountable task that you’ve already, on some level, accepted that you will not achieve. When you do this, you’re setting yourself up for failure and all the crappy feelings that come along with it. Instead, create a goal that you know you can achieve. Then, identify the specific blocks you’ve had in pursuit of this goal in the past – the reasons why you haven’t yet achieved it even though you know you could. Once you’ve got those reasons, you can work towards setting yourself up for success by addressing those blocks.

2) Be clear on your why.

Spend time defining your motivation. Write it down if you have to. Before committing to a specific goal, be very clear with yourself on why you want to achieve it, and then remind yourself of this motivation whenever you need an extra push.

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3) Have an accountability partner.

Find somebody you trust to help hold you accountable! Let them know what you’re working towards and why, and ask them to check in with you once in a while. Your closest accountability partner and biggest motivator should be yourself, but if you have another person who can be there to surprise you with check ins, and to hear your successes and struggles, you’ll be a little more likely to continue down the right path.

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4) Celebrate your successes.

Know the stepping stones towards the bigger picture, and celebrate those small successes. Decide in the beginning what your treats to yourself will be. Is your goal to spin three times a week? Maybe after a month of consistent spinning you treat yourself to a new water bottle or go out for brunch. You should acknowledge your efforts and be proud of all you accomplish in pursuit of your ultimate goal.

5) Know that it’s not all or nothing.

One of the greatest downfalls of reaching goals is the idea that one misstep means that we’ve failed. If you want to spin three times a week, and one week you only make it onto the bike once, it’s easy to throw your hands up and decide you’ve already failed, so you may as well give up. Instead of buying into this “all or nothing” attitude, be gentle and remind yourself that it’s a learning process and a slow build towards your goal. You can try again next week to make it to class three times, and if you only go twice, well that’s still a step in the right direction!

Do you have any goals for 2019? Share in the comments below!